8 Ways to Find Balance

A person’s ability to achieve a health balance between professional and personal life directly contributes to overall happiness and job performance. According to Small Business Trends, 66% of full time employees believe they lack a healthy work-life balance. For employers, this relates to poor productivity, low morale, and high turnover. For individuals, this means missing out on spending time with people and at events we enjoy. Even scarier, long term effects of an unhealthy work-life balance may include higher risk of depression and anxiety and higher risk of heart disease or stroke. Family Living Today and Now Sourcing investigated statistics across the globe, ranking the United States 30th out of 38 countries in work-life balance.

Recent statistics show that 11.4% of Americans work over 50 hours per week. As someone who still sometimes gets stuck in the whirlwind of the working world, I’ve compiled a list of methods in which we can all adopt a lifestyle that promotes a healthy balance between our work and ourselves.

  1. Figure out what a work-life balance means to you. As individuals, we all need different things to regroup and recharge. Some may need more alone time, while some may benefit from more time with loved ones. Identifying what exactly we need to feel a greater sense of balance is the first step in achieving it.
  2. Set manageable goals. Having a realistic idea of how much work we are able to manage in a day is crucial in avoiding setting ourselves up for failure. Create goals that are SMART (Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Time-Bound).
  3. Prioritize. Create a daily to-do list and start with the tasks that need to be completed that day. At the end of the day, if there are things that need to wait until tomorrow, they will be things that can wait until tomorrow.
  4. Learn to say no and delegate. We all want to be good at our jobs, but part of being a productive employee is recognizing if something will be biting off more than we can chew. Instead of saying yes, try: “Although I would love to be a part of that project, but I feel it may be best to focus on my current projects at this time. Maybe we can assign this to project to someone who can put the time into it that it deserves.” Be honest. Chances are we would rather be great at one job than just okay at several jobs.
  5. Be more productive at the office. Turn the cell phone off. Minimize distractions. Do what is needed to do in order to allow yourself to get the job done, which may help you……
  6. Leave work at work! This is the best advice I’ve gotten from a supervisor: “After work, allow yourself the time to process and reflect on the day as you collect your things and walk to your car. As you shut your car door and drive away, leave the work day where it is: behind you.” In addition, by being more productive in the office, we can limit the amount of work we are doing from home. Small Business Trends reported that 40% of employees believe it is acceptable to answer an important work email at the dinner table. Part of having a healthy work-life balance is making a clear separation between work and life.
  7. Take more mental health days. I hate taking days off, and sometimes I feel like I need “TAKE MORE MENTAL HEALTH DAYS” written in big, flashing letters above my desk. Sometimes I feel overwhelmed with the fact that work goes on without me when I’m not there, and it’s hard to return and feel like I need to “catch up.” However, the more I allow myself a mental health day, the more I find myself in a better mindset to tackle the tasks ahead of me with ease.
  8. Have more fun. It’s hard to avoid spending time away from work simply gearing up to resume the grind. We can’t forget to have fun! Go outside, spend time with family, hit the gym. Social interactions and healthy self care skills have a direct positive impact on both mood and productivity.

Most importantly, we must be gentle on ourselves. If we find ourselves burnt out or overwhelmed, we can reflect and ask ourselves, “How have I been balancing lately?” It’s hard to navigate between wanting to be good at our jobs and wanting to be good to ourselves, but hopefully some of these changes in daily routine can help to alleviate some of the imbalance.

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